Sunshine, Allergies And Weight Loss?

Sunshine, Allergies And Weight Loss?

Did you know there’s a connection between allergies and vitamin D deficiencies? Learn more about the connections and what you can do about it.

In most people, allergies first appear during infancy or childhood and rank first among children’s chronic diseases.1

A new paper published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found a link between low vitamin D levels and the onset of allergies in children. The study of over 3,000 children concluded that among children with low or deficient levels of vitamin D, sensitivity to allergens was present in more than half of those for which they tested.2 Not only do allergies cause itchy eyes, runny nose and headaches but they also add a level of discomfort and misery to a person’s life.

Even in a place like Florida where there is no shortage of vitamin D because of the sunny weather, there is a disconnect between children and their physical presence outside. There is no reason for a child to go outside because of the new technology today that keeps them occupied on the couch. That is not only leading to a startling deficiency in vitamin D, but also an alarming rate of childhood obesity and other chronic diseases. Caucasian skin produces approximately 10,000 IU vitamin D in response to 20 to 30 minutes of summer sun exposure. This is over 16 times higher than the US government’s recommendation of 600 IU per day.3

There are two types of this vitamin that you need to consider. Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and D3 (cholecalciferol) both of which are good sources, but one of them is far better than the other. When sunlight hits your skin, D3 is absorbed far deeper into the body which is called bioavailability. Research shows that D2 (ergocalciferol) has lower bioactivity, poorer stability, and shorter duration of action, resulting in approximately 33% lower potency compared with vitamin D3.4 In other words, when supplementing with Vitamin D products, make sure you take high quality D3. Supplementation is safe for children, but the best source for them is natural sunlight acquired from being active outdoors.

Other Good News On Vitamin D For Those Looking To Lose Weight!

New research shows that vitamin D may help.  While vitamin D has gained acclaim for its anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties, researchers at the University of Southern California and McGill University recently discovered that insufficient vitamin D levels were also associated with increased fat levels.5  What’s more is that 59% of the study’s participants had insufficient amounts of vitamin D.

Are you and your children getting enough vitamin D? Here are ways to ensure that you are:

  • Regularly get midday sun exposure in the late spring, summer, and early fall, exposing as much of the skin as possible for 20–30 minutes (being careful to never burn).Those with dark skin will need longer exposure time — up to six times longer
  • Eat foods rich in vitamin d such as, eggs,  grass fed meat, and fatty fish.  Cod liver oil, mackerel, salmon and sardines are the best Vitamin D fish
  • Take 5,000 IU’s of Vitamin D3, due to our natural deficiencies, per day for 2–3 months, especially during those months with less sunlight (amounts will vary with age)

If you and your children are not taking all of these steps, then you are putting them and yourself at risk for a number of potential health problems and not just allergies. Don’t forget to nurture your body with one of the most readily available vitamins because you’re stuck inside and don’t eat properly. If you need an extra boost,which research shows most adults and children do, pick up Maximized Living’s vitamin D3 today by finding a Maximized Living Doctor in your area.


  1. American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 2010
  2. Shimi Sharief, Sunit Jariwala, Juhi Kumar, Paul Muntner, Michal L. Melamed. Vitamin D levels and food and environmental allergies in the United States: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2011
  3. http://www.vitamindcouncil.com
  4. Barbara J. Zarowitz PharmD. The Value of Vitamin D3 over Vitamin D2 in Older Persons
  5. Gilsanz V, et al. Vitamin D status and its relation to muscle mass and muscle fat in young women.  Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2010. Vol 95. No 4. 1595-1601.

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